Why it’s Time to Stop Talking about Food

Why it’s Time to Stop Talking about Food

I’m sick of talking about food. I’m sick of talking about food, and what you can and can’t and should and shouldn’t eat. I’m sick of looking at pictures of food on instagram. I’m sick of meal plans and righteous conversations and biohacks and mean-spirited debates over macronutrients. I like eating food. I like cooking it too. I like appreciating the way it tastes, and I like how sharing a meal with someone creates opportunities for communication and connection. But if I see one more instagram of the same breakfast accompanied by a preachy post about how nourished it makes you feel… Well, I might just lose my lunch. The thing about disordered eating is that you can’t stop it—whether it’s restriction or bingeing—by talking about food. You can’t stop disordered eating by talking about food. @missskinnygenes #discoverynotrecovery Click To Tweet You can “recover” (gain or lose the weight), but you’ll never stop relapsing if you don’t take your eyes off of your own (and everyone else’s plate). This is why I’ve become very conflicted about ancestral health (or “Paleo”) as of late. In fact, you may have noticed that, over the last year, I’ve moved away from talking about “Paleo” and “health” at all. That’s because I’ve already done the recovery work. And done it again. And again. And it served it’s purpose each time. But the point of recovery from ANY kind of dieting or disordered eating mindset is NOT to do the work a second time. It’s to stop relapsing. It’s to break free from the disorder and start living and loving your life. Paleo served...
Why I Wrote Weight Loss Unlocked (Guest Post by Stefani Ruper)

Why I Wrote Weight Loss Unlocked (Guest Post by Stefani Ruper)

IMPORTANT! THE BODY IMAGE REPORT IS OUT! FIND OUT WHY WE’RE ALL SO CRAZY ABOUT FOOD, FITNESS, & BODY IMAGE (and thank you to those of you who took the survey!) Today’s blog post is actually a guest post by my friend Stefani Ruper of Paleo for Women. I actually reached out to her to write today’s post, because, as you may know, I’m a huge fan of hers…but what you may not know is that I really struggled with her latest book.  Weight Loss Unlocked seemed to come out of left field, and while I believe in the science and the recommendations she makes as a result of her research, as someone who cares deeply about NOT playing into the weight loss myth anymore, I really couldn’t stand behind the title or the intent.  So I asked Stefani to explain in her own words why, as an eating disorder advocate, she wrote this book. You can read more below. And if you do not have an eating disorder and are honestly looking to change the conversation that you are having with yourself about health and weight, then you can check out her book HERE. —- Hi Kaila’s audience. My name is Stefani. Kaila and I go way back (or, I suppose, as far back as is possible in the paleo blogging days). I am writing to you today because want to be transparent with you about a conversation Kaila and I recently had. I think it’s important. You may have heard that I recently released a program called Weight Loss Unlocked: The Paleo Woman’s Solution. My relationship with this program has...
UNpodcast 083 & The Myth of the Perfect Diet

UNpodcast 083 & The Myth of the Perfect Diet

TL;DR: Go listen to today’s interview with Mickey Trescott! I want to start off by saying that “orthorexia” is not actually considered to be an actual DSM-V diagnosable eating disorder. I also want to start off by saying that orthorexia is taking over our collective first-world, health-obsessed consciousness, and it might as well be an actual DSM-V diagnosable eating disorder for all of the pain, struggle, and emotional distress it’s causing. I also also want to start by saying that eating as well as you can as often as you can is probably a good idea, and may have some positive impacts in terms of environmental ethics and the treatment of animals in addition to being good for your overall health. And I three-times also want to start by saying that if you can’t eat “perfectly” all the time, it is neither a crime nor a cause for panic. With very few exceptions, not eating a perfect diet is not going to cause you to die on the spot. (I realize that there were a lot of “alsos” and double negatives in the above, and I apologize for being convoluted in advance. But even a professional writer can’t be a perfect grammarist all the time. [Aside: see what I did there?]) Yet, for some reason, we associate the perfect diet with perfect health—and develop deep fears around straying from the perfect path. But not eating a perfect diet all of the time isn’t bad—because there a) is no perfect diet and b) humans aren’t perfect. If we were, we’d still be dancing around naked in a garden, and while that sounds like a perfectly...
Paleo: Asterisk, or, Thoughts on the Ancestral Health Symposium

Paleo: Asterisk, or, Thoughts on the Ancestral Health Symposium

A few days ago, I completed my month of insanity classes and travel by spending three days in Berkeley at the Ancestral Health Symposium. This is the first AHS I have ever attended (although I have a very vivid memory of listening to Robb Wolf’s podcast/recap of AHS and being very jealous that I wasn’t there back when I started this Paleo thing in 2012), and, despite the exhaustion of traveling and working and learning all month, I was incredibly excited to spend the weekend geeking out about the science of ancestral health. While AHS and Paleo F(X) feature many of the same speakers and host many of the same members of the community, there’s definitely a difference between the two conferences—which make them good complements to one another. AHS definitely caters to a less-beginner crowd, which means that the talks are a little bit less accessible to newbies to the ancestral health movement—but that also means that less time is spent on trying to explain what the scientific terms mean and more on explaining why they’re relevant. I really enjoyed all of the talks that I was able to attend (while running back and forth across the campus in order to somehow make it between buildings in the short 10 minutes between sessions), and I learned a lot about everything from exercise physiology to chronic pain, leptin resistance to epigenetics and methylation. I also had the chance to get to hug a ton of incredible people (because #hugsarepaleo) and make some new friends (as well as reconnect with some old friends too). Even more important than the content...