Why I Don’t “What I Ate Wednesday”

Why I Don’t “What I Ate Wednesday”

How many of you out there follow a blog that features “What I Ate Wednesday?” Raise your hands high, now–and then look around. I bet you see a lot of (imaginary, virtual) hands in the air. During the days of my second relapse with EDNOS (circa 2009), I discovered food bloggers. You know the ones–run by stick-thin plant-based runners* with high-quality cameras and perfect, stick-thin plant-based running boyfriends with cute pseudonyms based on the blog title.** The ones who post their workouts followed by high-res pictures of their oatmeal with peanut butter mixed in (a “treat meal” for after their long run). Around the time I discovered food bloggers, I also happened to be obsessed with “clean eating” and bodybuilding, so my days were full of “good” bad food habits: eating 200 calorie “meals” made of protein, protein, and protein (with vegetables) every 3 hours and hours spent lifting weights and pedaling away on the arc trainer at high intensity every single day. Because I wasn’t working at the time, my days (post-workout) were spent standing in “my corner” in the kitchen (I was too high-strung to sit), reading these blogs, and starving until I could prepare and eat my next “meal.” Like an alcoholic who goes to a bar just to sit and watch others drink, I followed the women who wrote those health blogs, feeding myself on the imagined enjoyment of the “decadent” foods they’d post on “What I Ate Wednesday.”   Why We “What I Ate”     Now, I understand why so many people feel the need to document their meals–many of these bloggers have...
Why I’m Not a Vegan, Part 3: But I Supplement!

Why I’m Not a Vegan, Part 3: But I Supplement!

My Disclaimer  My decision to stop being a vegan was based on a gut feeling–literally and figuratively: the blog post(s) that I’m about to provide you with are simply based on all of the research I’ve done since making the decision to stop being a vegan.  I’m writing it all here not to promote any kind of orthorexia or nutritionism or restrictive eating or dogma–I’m writing it here because there are people who want to understand the potential health implications of a low-fat plant-based diet.   I’m not a doctor or a nutritionist–just a girl who is sick and tired of being sick and tired–and sick and tired of watching so many people make decisions based on half-truths, emotional appeals, and ingrained biases that ultimately leave them sick and tired too. Read Why I’m Not a Vegan Part 1: What is Veganism?  Why I’m Not a Vegan Part 2: What Happened When I Was a Vegan Why I’m Not a Vegan Part 4: Tofu is a health food. Right? Why I’m Not a Vegan Part 5: Macronutrients and Why They Matter Why I’m Not a Vegan Part 6: What Veganism Gets Right Why I’m Not a Vegan Part 7: Veganism and Eating Disorders Why I’m Not a Vegan, Epilogue: Is Paleo the Answer? But I Supplement! Look, I get it. We live in the modern world. We’ve depleted the soil. We’ve filled our fish with toxic levels of mercury. Our cows are stressed and our chickens are unhappy. Our fruits and vegetables have undergone all sorts of mutations and our modern tomatoes are nothing like the heirlooms that our grandparents ate....
5 Ways to Start Letting Go of Food Rules

5 Ways to Start Letting Go of Food Rules

Back when I was training to become a figure competitor (aka during my last and worse relapse with ED), I thought I had it all figured out: The carefully researched broscience in my muscle magazines told me that I was supposed to be eating small meals six times per day, and that they should include lots of lean proteins, veggies, and complex carbohydrates. Beyond the crutch of the leaning out meal plans included in many issues of said magazines, I found myself fairly comfortable in the knowledge that, as long as I was eating some combination of the same types of foods every day in small quantities, I would be able to achieve my dream of making my fat* disappear. But when I finally came to my senses–when the body building dream came crashing down around me due to injury, sickness, and amenorrhea–and I had to return to eating real food, I was at a complete loss. The problem was that I had been conditioned to believe certain things about how and when it was “right” to eat, and anything that conflicted with that belief was unimaginable as an option. Needless to say, when I realized that protein powder pudding and chicken breast with broccoli in 250 calorie portions at 6 am, 9 am, 12 pm, 3 pm, 6 pm, and 9 pm were not really options anymore, I was in trouble: I realized that not only had I forgotten how to eat, but I was also afraid to eat.  [source] Afraid to miss a meal, even if I wasn’t hungry. Afraid to eat outside of the three or...
UN-Podcast 019: UNtimed

UN-Podcast 019: UNtimed

[source] I’ve said it before, but I think it bears repeating (again and again, since it seems to surprise me every time): our paths are inexplicably intertwined with the paths of those who need to be a part of our lives. It seemed to be a theme of Paleo F(X), where every person at that event seemed to become a part of my journey in some way or another. One such fellow traveler is Madelyn Moon, of Moon Fitness. We met at the panel on transformation, realizing that we had found kindred souls in one another in terms of our history with fitness and body image in the world of figure competitions. Madelyn is in the middle of her own transformation as we speak–a different transformation. One that doesn’t necessarily involve competing on a stage (although the future may hold that kind of transformation for her again someday), but a transformation from student to health coach. In fact, it was Madelyn who convinced me to take the final leap and do my own health coaching certification through the Institute of Integrative Nutrition. There’s something really beautiful about the spectrum of ways we can become coaches. For me, I intend to focus on helping men and women leave behind the transformation mindset–but I realize that, while I retired my 5 inch heels before they ever graced the NPC stage, not everyone wants to leave it behind. Madelyn’s approach to health coaching involves helping women who still want to transform their bodies–for competition or for fitness. Her desire, however, is not to simply coach people toward a certain body fat percentage...
UN-Podcast 013: UNintentional

UN-Podcast 013: UNintentional

[SOURCE] You guys. Please, if you do nothing else today, GO LISTEN TO THE FINDING OUR HUNGER PODCAST.  Seriously. Episode 013 is just. so. good. We talked with my friend Andrea Feucht of andreaworks.com, and it was just such a fantastically organic, moving, exciting conversation about body image, recovery, momentum, community building, finding direction, fitness, communication, accountability, etc. etc. etc. The stakes are high. GO LISTEN NOW. You can also subscribe through iTunes so you never miss a podcast–and, please, if you like what you hear (and even if you don’t!) leave us a review! Stay hungry, @MissSkinnyGenes P.S. are you ready to join an intentional...