Death By Food Pyramid: A Personal Review

Death By Food Pyramid: A Personal Review

Even though I think we should never use the “W” word…it’s okay in this context: It’s Healthy Weight Week! Check out some of the resources in this document and get ready to celebrate a whole week dedicated to loving your body. Okay…onto your regularly scheduled post.  I just want to say, before you get to this review, that no one asked me to review this book. I didn’t receive a free copy, I’m not getting paid, and I don’t receive any benefit from sharing it.* It’s just that damn good that I couldn’t not share it with you. And I hope you read it and it changes your life, at least a little bit. You know how sometimes you read a book and from the first line you’re so hooked that you can’t put it down, can’t stop thinking about it when you do put it down, and want everyone else to pick it up when you’re done with it? Yeah. That’s how I felt about John Durant’s The Paleo Manifesto last year, and that’s how I feel about Denise Minger’s Death By Food Pyramid now. Here’s the thing: it’s pretty clear from my somewhat “unconventional” feelings about nutrition that some of what Denise writes in Death by Food Pyramid wasn’t going to be a surprise. [i.e. The government’s been lying to us—and lying to itself—about nutrition for (at least) the last 50 years, and politics, ethics, and science do not always align to create health.] But this book needed to be written. And it needs to be read. I’m going to be the first to admit that I’ve...

The Incredible, Edible…Calorie? (Trigger Warning)

Believe it or not, before 1918, people lived without calorie counters. Yes, folks, you heard me: before the end of the first World War, it was possible to eat a sandwich without entering every morsel into Fitday.* What happened? It’s not like once the calorie was discovered, it started infiltrating our food and making us fat, forcing us to begin counting in order to stave off weight gain. A couple of things: First of all, we as first-world denizens started eating more processed foods and drastically increased the amount of sugar we consumed on a daily (and monthly and yearly) basis. Second of all, with the rise of the moving picture industry and its resulting stars, we started to become a nation focused on the importance of image. Third, and most damaging, of all, we figured out that we could quantify ourselves and our food. And suddenly, the diet industry had a powerful tool that led to its quick explosion. In 1918, one Miss Lulu Hunt Peters published a little diet book that introduced the population to a new way of manipulating the body through food: by counting the “newly discovered” calorie.   Apparently, however, diet books published in 1918 don’t come with trigger warnings (so those of you who need one, please consider that before you read the following excerpt). Because it was published in the teens (and therefore a few years out of copyright), Lulu Hunt Peters’ Diet and Health with a Key to the Calories is available as a free download through Project Gutenberg. So I downloaded it to my Kindle app and started reading. And...